Canadian Poultry Research Council

 

The Canadian Poultry Research Council (CPRC) was formed in 2001 to address the national poultry research needs of the four national feather boards (Chicken Farmers of Canada, Canadian Hatching Egg Producers, Egg Farmers of Canada, Turkey Farmers of Canada) and the Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council. CPRC serves these member groups through the coordination and implementation of its Poultry Science Cluster – securing matching and additional cluster funding to deliver an efficient poultry research program in Canada based on national research priorities.

As part of this initiative, the Poultry Industry Council is responsible for the KTT and communications of research results. We are pleased to be part of launching a new resource hub, a one-stop-shop for research results, calls for proposals and more!

 
cprc hub
The new poultrysciencecluster.ca website is live! 
This new microsite is home to info on CPRC-funded cluster 1, 2, and 3 projects, as well as the research stories we have written for a number of these projects – and continue to develop. 
The new poultrysciencecluster.ca has made in Canada research for every part of the poultry value chain:
  • Food safety
  • Antimicrobial stewardship
  • Poultry Health
  • Sustainability
  • Welfare

Read articles highlighting results from Canadian Funded Projects, find out:

  • What stocking density is best for turkey toms
  • How new IBV variants can reduce egg production by up to 50%
  • How LED lighing can increase revenue
  • Going for good gut health try yeast-based enzymes
  • The fresh factor, how clean air and litter matter to birds
  • How the packaging of vaccines could deliver better efficacy
  • Bacteriophages show promise of reducing risk of key foodborne pathogens
  • Find out how new ventilation tools impact air qualit
  • How calm, smart and physically fit birds thrive in aviary systems
  • Find out how warm and cool conditions impact turkeys in transport
  • Read about the 3 recommendations to improve hen locomotion